Health department to spray for mosquitoes Oct. 10

The Lexington-Fayette County Health Department is reporting a probable case of West Nile Virus in a human. As a result, the health department will conduct mosquito-spraying activities in the pre-dawn hours Thursday morning in portions of the 40502, 40507 and 40508 ZIP codes. The route will focus on the downtown areas between Euclid Avenue and Main Street, including Woodland Park. This is the first reported probable human case of West Nile Virus in Fayette County this year.

Spraying will be done between 3-6 a.m. Thursday. For spraying to occur, the wind speed must be less than 10 mph, the temperature must be greater than 55o F and there can be no rain or dense fog. The mosquito spray used by the health department only affects adult mosquitoes that are in the air at the time of spraying. The health department uses Duet, an EPA-approved agent that features a component that stimulates resting mosquitoes in trees and foliage, causing them to fly into the air and come into contact with the spray’s mosquito-killing agent, sumithrin. Duet has been rigorously tested for human and animal safety and is registered for outdoor residential and recreational areas.

Lexington residents can also take steps at home to fight mosquitoes:

  • Mosquito-proof your home and yard. Fix or install window and door screens. Mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water. Cover or eliminate empty containers with standing water. Limit the number of places around your home for mosquitoes to breed by getting rid of items such as tires, buckets, barrels and cans. Refresh the water in your pet’s water dishes and birdbaths at least every five to seven days.
  • Be aware of peak mosquito activity times. The twilight hours around dusk and dawn are times of peak mosquito activity. Use insect repellent when outdoors especially during peak activity times, including early morning hours. Look for EPA-labeled repellents containing active ingredients, such as DEET, Picaridin (KBR3023) or oil of lemon eucalyptus (p-menthane 3,8-diol). Apply repellent according to label instructions. When weather permits, wear long sleeves, long pants and socks outdoors. Mosquitoes can bite through thin clothing, so spraying clothes with repellent containing permethrin or another EPA-registered repellent helps prevent bites.

The health department also conducts surveys in neighborhoods around Lexington to identify standing water problems that can serve as a location for mosquitoes to lay their eggs. Elimination of standing water is the ultimate goal, but in areas where standing water cannot be eliminated the water can be treated to kill mosquito larvae with a chemical called a larvicide.

To report a standing water problem in your neighborhood, please call the health department’s Environmental Health section at (859) 231-9791. For additional information, like the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LFCHD, or follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/LFCHD and Instagram at @lexpublichealth.

All health department services now at 650 Newtown Pike; clinic has new hours

The Lexington-Fayette County Health Department’s services are now in one location: 650 Newtown Pike (the corner of Newtown Pike and Loudon Avenue).

The Public Health Clinic, including our WIC program, also has new hours:

  • 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday
  • 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Tuesday
  • 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Wednesday
  • 8-11:30 a.m. Thursday
  • 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Friday

To reach the Public Health Clinic, please call 859-288-2483. You can also learn more here: Public Health Clinic. En español: Clínica de Salud Pública.

First flu case confirmed in Lexington

Flu season has officially started in Lexington.

The Lexington-Fayette County Health Department is reporting the city’s first lab-confirmed case of the flu for the 2019-20 flu season. Information about the case cannot be provided because of federal privacy laws.

Last year, Lexington had 5 deaths from flu-related causes and 506 confirmed cases of the flu, which only represents a small fraction since most flu cases are not lab-confirmed). The CDC estimates as many as 25 percent of the population gets the flu annually.

“A seasonal flu shot is recommended to all people ages 6 months and older and is the best way to avoid getting the flu,” LFCHD spokesperson Kevin Hall said.

The health department is providing free flu shots to the community 1-7 p.m. Oct. 10 at Fayette Mall, near the interior entrance of Dillard’s, as part of its annual preparedness exercise.

Flu shots are also available 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Friday and 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Wednesday in the Public Health Clinic, 650 Newtown Pike, starting Sept. 30. No appointment is necessary. The cost of a flu shot varies based on insurance, so call 859-288-2483 for details. Medicaid/Medicare, cash, checks, credit cards and most insurance plans are accepted.

Free Flu Shots at the Mall, Y’all: annual event returns 10/10

The Lexington-Fayette County Health Department is once again giving you the chance to fight the flu for free.

The department’s annual free flu shot event will be held 1-7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10, at Fayette Mall, near the interior entrance of Dillard’s.

“An annual flu shot is the best way to fight the flu each fall and winter,” LFCHD spokesman Kevin Hall said. “The special clinic lets us test our emergency preparedness skills by giving a large amount of shots in a short amount of time.”

The seasonal flu shot is recommended for all people ages 6 months and older. Last flu season, Lexington had 5 deaths from flu-related causes and 506 confirmed cases. The health department provided 1,767 flu shots throughout the season, including 1,165 at last year’s free flu shot clinic.

“Lexington had 506 confirmed flu cases last year, but that represents a small fraction since most flu cases aren’t lab-confirmed,” Hall said. “The CDC estimates 5-20 percent of the U.S. population gets the flu each year, costing an estimated $10.4 billion in medical expenses and $16.3 billion in lost earnings.”

For community members unable to get their flu shots at the special free event, the health department will offer flu shots 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Friday and 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Wednesday in the Public Health Clinic, 650 Newtown Pike, starting Oct. 1. No appointment is necessary. The cost of a flu shot varies based on insurance, so call 859-288-2483 for details. Medicaid/Medicare, cash, checks, credit cards and most insurance plans are accepted.

Hepatitis A: Get vaccination, wash your hands for prevention

(Updated Aug. 2, 2019) Hepatitis A is a liver disease that can easily be passed from person to person and can be spread through close contact with someone infected with it. Washing your hands with soap and warm water after using the bathroom, changing a diaper or before making food and drinks can help stop the spread of hepatitis A.

More than 4,790 cases have been reported across Kentucky since the fall of 2017, compared to around 20 cases that are typically recognized each year. There have been 59 deaths associated with hepatitis A in this outbreak. Though the outbreak was initially centered in the Louisville area, outbreak-related cases have now been reported in 110 counties across the state, including Fayette. Learn more about which counties have hepatitis A in this Kentucky hepatitis A report.

The best prevention is with a hepatitis A vaccination. The hepatitis A vaccine, given in two doses six months apart, is available from some medical providers and many pharmacies in Lexington and is covered by most insurance plans. The vaccine is also available at the health department’s Public Health Clinic by appointment. Call 859-288-2483 to check availability and to schedule an appointment. You can learn more in our Hep A Q&A!

Starting in the 2018-19 school year, Kentucky students are required to have the vaccination. Please check with your medical provider to see if your child has been vaccinated.

Good handwashing can also help control the spread of hepatitis A. Consistent and careful handwashing, including under the fingernails, for at least 20 seconds with soap and water can help stop the spread of the virus.

You can learn more about hepatitis A in this interview from Healthy Times, our radio show on Lexington Community Radio: hepatitis A interview.

Hepatitis FAQs

Please check out our new page with frequently asked questions about hepatitis A: hepatitis A FAQs.

Information for Providers

  • The Lexington-Fayette County Health Department is urging providers to vaccinate all adult patients against hepatitis A, not just those in a high-risk category.
  • Consider providing Twinrix® to those who have previously not been vaccinated for hepatitis B.
  • Per Immunization Regulation 902 KAR 2:060, two doses of hepatitis A (HepA) vaccine will be required for all children aged 19 months through 18 years who attend daycare, primary and secondary school beginning on or after July 1, 2018 for the 2018‐2019 school year. Children aged 12 months through 18 months will require one dose of HepA vaccine. Providers should now catch‐up children aged two years and older to assure hepatitis A immunity.

Community Flyers

Click on a flyer below for a larger format to share:

Wash Your Hands

What You Should Know

High-Risk Groups

 

Health department to spray for mosquitoes July 16

To help control mosquitoes, the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department will conduct mosquito-spraying activities in the pre-dawn hours on July 16 in the 40504 ZIP code. The spraying is due to a high mosquito population found in a monitoring trap in the 40504 ZIP code region.

Spraying will be done between 3-6 a.m. Tuesday. For spraying to occur, the wind speed must be less than 10 mph, the temperature must be greater than 55o F and there can be no rain or dense fog. The mosquito spray used by the health department only affects adult mosquitoes that are in the air at the time of spraying. The health department uses Duet, an EPA-approved agent that features a component that stimulates resting mosquitoes in trees and foliage, causing them to fly into the air and come into contact with the spray’s mosquito-killing agent, sumithrin. Duet has been rigorously tested for human and animal safety and is registered for outdoor residential and recreational areas.

Lexington residents can also take steps at home to fight mosquitoes:

Mosquito-proof your home and yard. Fix or install window and door screens. Mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water. Cover or eliminate empty containers with standing water. Limit the number of places around your home for mosquitoes to breed by getting rid of items such as tires, buckets, barrels and cans. Refresh the water in your pet’s water dishes and birdbaths at least every five to seven days.

Be aware of peak mosquito activity times. The twilight hours around dusk and dawn are times of peak mosquito activity. Use insect repellent when outdoors especially during peak activity times, including early morning hours. Look for EPA-labeled repellents containing active ingredients, such as DEET, Picaridin (KBR3023) or oil of lemon eucalyptus (p-menthane 3,8-diol). Apply repellent according to label instructions. When weather permits, wear long sleeves, long pants and socks outdoors. Mosquitoes can bite through thin clothing, so spraying clothes with repellent containing permethrin or another EPA-registered repellent helps prevent bites.

The health department also conducts surveys in neighborhoods around Lexington to identify standing water problems that can serve as a location for mosquitoes to lay their eggs. Elimination of standing water is the ultimate goal, but in areas where standing water cannot be eliminated the water can be treated to kill mosquito larvae with a chemical called a larvicide.

To report a standing water problem in your neighborhood, please call the health department’s Environmental Health section at (859) 231-9791.

For additional information, like the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LFCHD, or follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/LFCHD and Instagram at @lexpublichealth.

Update: Health department to spray for mosquitoes July 11

Due to equipment issues, the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department was unable to complete mosquito spraying on July 10. The issues have been resolved and mosquito spraying will continue 3-6 a.m. on July 11 in parts of the 40505 and 40511 ZIP codes. The spraying is due to a high mosquito population found in a monitoring trap in the 40505 ZIP code region. To provide adequate spray coverage of the area, portions of 40511 ZIP code will also be sprayed.

For spraying to occur, the wind speed must be less than 10 mph, the temperature must be greater than 55o F and there can be no rain or dense fog. The mosquito spray used by the health department only affects adult mosquitoes that are in the air at the time of spraying. The health department uses Duet, an EPA-approved agent that features a component that stimulates resting mosquitoes in trees and foliage, causing them to fly into the air and come into contact with the spray’s mosquito-killing agent, sumithrin. Duet has been rigorously tested for human and animal safety and is registered for outdoor residential and recreational areas.

Lexington residents can also take steps at home to fight mosquitoes:

  • Mosquito-proof your home and yard. Fix or install window and door screens. Mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water. Cover or eliminate empty containers with standing water. Limit the number of places around your home for mosquitoes to breed by getting rid of items such as tires, buckets, barrels and cans. Refresh the water in your pet’s water dishes and birdbaths at least every five to seven days.
  • Be aware of peak mosquito activity times. The twilight hours around dusk and dawn are times of peak mosquito activity. Use insect repellent when outdoors especially during peak activity times, including early morning hours. Look for EPA-labeled repellents containing active ingredients, such as DEET, Picaridin (KBR3023) or oil of lemon eucalyptus (p-menthane 3,8-diol). Apply repellent according to label instructions. When weather permits, wear long sleeves, long pants and socks outdoors. Mosquitoes can bite through thin clothing, so spraying clothes with repellent containing permethrin or another EPA-registered repellent helps prevent bites.

The health department also conducts surveys in neighborhoods around Lexington to identify standing water problems that can serve as a location for mosquitoes to lay their eggs. Elimination of standing water is the ultimate goal, but in areas where standing water cannot be eliminated the water can be treated to kill mosquito larvae with a chemical called a larvicide.

To report a standing water problem in your neighborhood, please call the health department’s Environmental Health section at (859) 231-9791. For additional information, like the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LFCHD, or follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/LFCHD and Instagram at @lexpublichealth.

LFCHD Community Farmers’ Market returning July 10

Healthy food options will soon be a bit easier thanks to the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department and the city’s two farmers’ markets.

Starting July 10, the health department will bring farmers from the Bluegrass Farmers’ Market and the Lexington Farmers’ Market together to give the community a chance to buy fresh fruits and vegetables. The LFCHD Community Farmers’ Market will begin 8 a.m.-1 p.m. July 10 at the health department’s south location, 2433 Regency Road.

The farmers’ markets will alternate locations in July and August:

  • 8 a.m.-1 p.m. July 10, 2433 Regency Road
  • 8 a.m.-1 p.m. July 24, 650 Newtown Pike
  • 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Aug. 14, 2433 Regency Road
  • 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Aug. 21, 650 Newtown Pike

For additional information, like the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LFCHD, or follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/LFCHD and Instagram at @lexpublichealth.

Safety tips will help during holiday and summer picnics

One out of every six people get sick from a foodborne illness each year, and a few extra precautions can help keep your summer meals, cookouts and picnics illness-free this year.

The Lexington-Fayette County Health Department wants to increase awareness of food safety as people head into the summer picnic season. The following food safety guidelines can help you prevent the spread of food-borne illness from picnic meals shared with family and friends:

  • Keep hands clean. Wash hands before eating or preparing food, after using the restroom, between handling raw and ready-to-eat items and after handling pets. Wash with hot soapy water and dry with paper towels.
  • Clean and sanitize surfaces often. To sanitize surfaces, use a solution of regular household bleach and warm water. Add about 1 tablespoon of bleach to 2 gallons of water for the right concentration. Sanitize by first washing and rinsing the surface and then immerse, spray or swab with the bleach solution.
  • Separate – don’t cross-contaminate. Separate raw foods from ready-to-eat foods. Use different cutting boards or wash, rinse and sanitize after contact with raw meat, poultry and seafood. Never use the same plate for holding raw meat and transporting cooked meat.
  • Be sure to wash all produce thoroughly before use. Thoroughly clean the outer surface before slicing and keep work surface and utensils clean and sanitized. Handle all cut melons carefully, including cantaloupe and watermelon. Promptly refrigerate sliced melon at 41 degrees Fahrenheit or lower.
  • Follow the cooking guidelines listed below for proper meat preparation. Cook food to the proper internal temperature. Always check the internal temperature of cooked foods with a metal-stemmed thermometer and cook another 15 seconds after the thermometer indicates it has reached the proper temperature.

 Ground beef: 160 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 seconds

Poultry and stuffed meats: 165 degrees F for 15 seconds

Pork products: 145 degrees F for 15 seconds

Other products: 145 degrees F for 15 seconds

Reheating leftovers: 165 degrees F for 15 seconds

  • Refrigerate leftovers promptly. Leftovers should be cooled and maintained within four hours at 41 degrees Fahrenheit or lower or frozen at zero degrees or lower. When you are unsure how long leftover food has been out of proper serving temperature, a good rule of thumb to follow is “when in doubt, throw it out!”

Fight the Bite: eliminate mosquitoes this summer

This summer, the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department plans to control mosquito populations in the community by bringing increased focus to eliminating standing water and preventing mosquito larvae from hatching. At the same time, the department will use mosquito trapping to identify areas where spraying for adult mosquitos would be most useful.

The health department has surveyed Lexington neighborhoods to identify and treat large areas of standing water that can serve as prime locations for mosquitoes to lay their eggs. Elimination of standing water is the ultimate goal, but in places where puddles exist, the water can be treated to kill mosquito larvae with a chemical called a larvicide.

“We are increasing activities to kill mosquito larvae in areas where standing water cannot be drained,” said Luke Mathis, Environmental Health and Preparedness team leader at LFCHD.  “Targeting immature mosquitoes is a more effective control strategy as it stops mosquitoes from developing into adults that can feed on humans and transmit mosquito-borne diseases like Zika and West Nile.”

The health department will no longer conduct routine mosquito spraying for adult mosquitoes throughout the city on a regular cycle. Instead, mosquito traps will be placed in potential problem areas. If a certain threshold of mosquito activity is reached, the department will conduct targeted spraying in the appropriate areas. Those areas will be announced via the health department’s website, www.lexingtonhealthdepartment.org, and social media pages.

For spraying, the health department uses Duet, an EPA-approved agent that features a component that stimulates resting mosquitoes in trees and foliage, causing them to fly into the air and come into contact with the spray’s mosquito-killing agent, sumithrin. Duet has been rigorously tested for human and animal safety and is registered for outdoor residential and recreational areas.

Lexington residents can also take steps at home to fight mosquitoes:

● Mosquito-proof your home and yard. Fix or install window and door screens. Mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water. Cover or eliminate empty containers with standing water. Limit the number of places around your home for mosquitoes to breed by getting rid of items such as tires, buckets, barrels and cans. Refresh the water in your pet’s water dishes and birdbaths at least every five to seven days.

● Be aware of peak mosquito activity times. The twilight hours around dusk and dawn are times of peak mosquito activity. Use insect repellent when outdoors especially during peak activity times, including early morning hours. Look for EPA-labeled repellents containing active ingredients, such as DEET, Picaridin (KBR3023) or oil of lemon eucalyptus (p-menthane 3,8-diol). Apply repellent according to label instructions. When weather permits, wear long sleeves, long pants and socks outdoors. Mosquitoes can bite through thin clothing, so spraying clothes with repellent containing permethrin or another EPA-registered repellent helps prevent bites.

“The battle against mosquitoes starts at every residence in Fayette County,” Mathis said. “By eliminating standing water, even something as small a capful of rain in your yard, you can remove areas for mosquitoes to lay eggs. It’s important for people to walk around their homes to see what they can do to help curb the mosquito population.”

To report a standing water problem in your neighborhood, please call the health department’s Environmental Health section at (859) 231-9791. For additional information, like the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LFCHD, or follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/LFCHD and Instagram at @lexpublichealth.Previous ArticleNow Offering Family Planning